Reeling in Readers: Creatively Promoting Books

I realized the other day that the link I posted won’t work on iDevices because of the flash component in SpicyNodes. Here is the same content in text/link format.

When I first started in the library several years ago the digital book trailer was the way to promote books. While I still see the value in book trailers (still post several a month), I also think it is essential for us to also look at other platforms for book promotion.  Here are just a few.

Thinglink

Create a poster you can “touch” with things like website links, videos, social media, and text.

Website: http://www.thinglink.com/
Sample: http://www.thinglink.com/scene/402645903845883904


QR Code Displays

Display books in the library with a QR code that links to information about the book, book reviews, series information, links to a movie, or facts about the author.
Tips on QR codes (the QR code tab): https://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=500988


Student Videos

Have students create short videos promoting a book they like. Can be short clips just showing them and the cover or an actual interview about why they liked the books. Be sure to choose a variety of students.

SpicyNodes

Use SpicyNodes to showcase read a like lists or genre spotlights.

Website: http://spicynodes.com
Sample: http://www.spicynodes.org/a/8b7baad730231d4448ca3cfdc6e2d8ad

Bookmarks

Create bookmarks for students as they check out in the library. Can have QR code links to library resources, photos related to books read in the classroom, popular genres, etc.

Sample: https://ssl.vuzit.com/s/7et7r?sid=ULN2K72IaKjKMBj7FuvsLHyFfd4siv5u

Book Blogs

Book blogs are still popular with students. They enjoy knowing what you are reading and how you think. Share frequently electronically and also post by book displays for students without Internet access.

Prezi Scavenger Hunts

Use Prezi and create short guess the book prezis, author information, or series challenges.

Website: http://prezi.com
Sample: http://prezi.com/ippwkaurje4o/genre/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy

Websites

Create simple websites or pages for book promotion such as read a like lists.

Website: http://education.weebly.com
Sample: http://readalikelists.weebly.com/

Popcorn Maker

Add pop up text to any video posted on YouTube, Vimeo, SoundCloud or HTML5. Think old school MTV pop up videos. Use this tool as a way to highlight things you want students to remember.

Website: https://popcorn.webmaker.org/
Sample: https://shacklibrary.makes.org/popcorn/199e

Podcasts

Record a short excerpt of the book with an introduction to why students would enjoy the book. Can have guest readers for a surprise students. Only need a program like Audacity, a computer, and a microphone.

Website: http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ for recording
Website: http://podbean.com for hosting

Talking Book Displays

Use a short recorder next to a book for book promotion. Have students or teachers record and have a contest for students to guess the voice.

Website: http://www.joann.com/record-it-button-/7528011.html

Flash Version of Links Above:

SpicyNodes link: http://www.spicynodes.org/a/476e7a88194a8ee05b402a797a901c19

5 Teaching Tools for Next Year

5 Teaching Tools for Next Year

So I figured if I was going to list five things I wanted to be better at next year, I should also think about five tools I wanted to use next year as well. 🙂

   spicynodesSpicynodes: http://www.spicynodes.org/

Spicynodes is a wonderful graphic organizer tool and bookmarking combined. I like that you do not have to have email to set up student accounts, so it is easy to use with any class. This year we only used it with AVID who made a Spicynode about a famous African American for Black History month. Several of those students used Spicynodes for other projects though, so they enjoyed the platform.  Spicynodes lets you add links, video, and pictures. You can embed into most websites or just share the link. I can’t figure out how to make it display right in WordPress though, but there is a link to flipped resources in an earlier post.

thinklinkThinglink: http://www.thinglink.com/

I learned about this website for the first time at TLA (library conference). What intrigues me most about this website is the amount of higher level thinking it allows. Students would choose a picture to represent a topic. They can then add links to video, text, or websites. When teaching in class I’d also want a reflective piece on why they chose that picture.  I’m trying with a class for the first time next week. Excited to see how it goes.  For the library, I want to use Thinglink as a vehicle for book promotion next year. I’ll link to the author website, book trailer, reviews, etc. This website does require email but not confirmation.

Popcorn MakerPopcorn Maker: https://popcorn.webmaker.org/  

I have not used Popcorn Maker at all but I’m intrigued. You find information on the web and add events like maps, articles, pop ups onto videos. It does require an account but I think that students might really get into this. We’ll see next year when I give it a try.

SocrativeSocrative: http://www.socrative.com/

Now that Socrative allows you to add pictures this is a fabulous free tool. Teachers create quizzes and students can log in on a computer or iPad; using the Socrative app) to answer the quizzes. Class results are shown instantly to the teacher so you can check for understanding and fix misconceptions. It is also easy to copy tests so you can rearrange the answer choices for different classes. One tip, be sure to clear camera between classes if using the same test. Students are sneaky and will just take a screenshot of the answer for the next class.

Webquests: http://webquest.org/

The above website is just one place to find webquests. A webquest takes students out into the web to search for specific content kind of like a scavenger hunt. They then use what they learn to answer a question; called a task in the webquest world. An example might be to use what they learned to design the cover of a magazine or a museum exhibit. Until recently I’d dismissed webquests as obsolete and outdated, but in a seminar I realized that the higher level thinking they promote is timeless. We probably won’t use many pre-created webquests, because it is better to customize your own, but I’m hoping to get some collaborative partnerships with history and science using these next year.